Humboldt Explorer

Overview:

The wonders of the Galapagos diving experience will be with you for a lifetime. Your seven nights and eight days will be filled with memories to last a lifetime- thrilling dives, exotic vistas- and these will be only a small part of your experience. Diving the Galapagos can be challenging but the rewards are great- schooling hammerheads, Galapagos sharks, whale sharks, mantas and myriad other pelages frequent these waters. Nature’s bounty not confined to the waters, of course- Charles Darwin’s work concentrated largely on the rare terrestrial ecosystems, which abound with flora and fauna unique to the archipelago.

Accommodations:

All cabins are air-conditioned and have private bath and showers, an ocean view, flat screen televisions and can be arranged to provide 2 twin beds or one large bed depending on guest needs. A partially covered sun deck with jacuzzi and ample seating areas, a salon including a lounge area, and a spacious dive deck with a large camera table.

Dining:

Aboard the Humboldt Explorer, lunch and evening meals usually consist of lots of salad, potatoes, rice, chicken, beef, pork, and fish. Breakfast is the usual fare of eggs, cereal, toast and fresh fruits.

Sample Itinerary:

Days aboard the M/V Humboldt Explorer generally involve a 6:30 am dive followed by breakfast, a dive at 10:30, lunch at 12:00 and an afternoon dive at 2:00 pm. Dinner is served at approximately 7:00 pm. Under current National Parks guidelines, no night dives or land visits are allowed.

  • Monday: San Cristobal- Guests fly to the Galapagos Islands from Mainland Ecuador, arriving in the islands mid-day. Guests are met at the airport and taken to the vessel. Boarding the vessel after 11:00 AM, guests will depart for a short crossing to a calm site for a check out dive and safety briefing. After dinner the vessel will depart to the next scheduled destination.
  • Tuesday: Bartoleme- 6:30, 9:30, dives. Sightings include rays and sea lions. Depart for Northern Islands.
  • Wednesday: Wolf Island- Landslide, Shark Bay, Pinaculo- 6:30, 10:30 and 2:00 dives. Sightings often include hammerheads, eagle rays, Galapagos sharks, and silky sharks. Night at anchor.
  • Thursday: Wolf Island- 6:30, 10:30 and 2:00 dives. Sightings often include hammerheads, red-lipped batfish, eagle rays, Galapagos sharks, and silky sharks. Night at anchor. Crossing to Darwin Island.
  • Friday: Darwin Island- 6:30, 10:30 and 2:00 dives. Sightings often include hammerheads, whale sharks, eagle rays, Galapagos sharks, turtles and silky sharks.
  • Saturday: Darwin Island- 6:30, 10:30 and 2:00 dives. Sightings often include hammerheads, whale sharks, eagle rays, Galapagos sharks, turtles and silky sharks.
  • Sunday: Cousin’s Rock- 6:30 and possible 8:30 dives- This is a great macro diving with an excellent chance of seeing sea horses, sea lions, and eagle rays. Lunch will be served while transiting to Santa Cruz (3 hours). In Santa Cruz visit the giant tortoises in the highlands, have an authentic Ecuadorian BBQ lunch, visit the town of Puerto Ayora and the Darwin Centre on your own.
  • Monday: Baltra/San Cristobal- Breakfast; depart the vessel by 9 AM. Guests are free to visit the beach in town to see sea lions and marine iguanas in their natural habitat ro take a short walk to the Interpretive Centre. Transfer back to the airport for 1 PM flight back to Quito or Guayaquil.

Diving:

The islands are best known for amazing shark diving around Wolf and Darwin Islands. These small and remote islands are best reached by liveaboard vessels for divers. Your diving experience here will generally include Galapagos sharks, silky sharks and lots of schooling hammerheads being cleaned by king angelfish. Seeing marine turtles, schools of tuna, eagle rays, and sea lions is very common and seeing a whale shark is very possible from June through November. All the islands you travel to are amazing sites for underwater photography.

Macro photographers will have their fill of sea horses, barnacle blennies, coral hawk fish, and many others. An abundance of rays are at many of the dive sites (including spotted rays, marble rays, golden rays and stingrays) along with sea lions, sea turtles, schools of grunts and snappers. The variety of life in these waters is unlike any other place, with thick schools of the native brown stripped salema, snappers, groupers, Chevron barracuda and huge sea turtles.

Speak Your Mind

*

Contact Us For More Info

Comments or questions are welcome.

* indicates required field